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Frequently Asked Questions

How do I submit my request for REPAYE?

The quickest and easiest way to submit your request for REPAYE is to complete the Income-Driven Repayment Request at https://studentaid.gov. If you are unable to complete the online request, you can get a copy of the paper request form on our Forms page.

Will my remaining balance be forgiven after 20 or 25 years?

Under REPAYE, your remaining balance will be forgiven after 20 or 25 years (you may qualify for forgiveness after 20 years if the loans being repaid under the REPAYE plan include only loans you received to pay for undergraduate study, whereas you may qualify for forgiveness after 25 years if the loans being repaid under the REPAYE plan include a loan you received to pay for graduate or professional study).

You can view your loan history and details at https://studentaid.gov.

Will I have to pay taxes on the amount forgiven under the REPAYE plan?

Under current IRS rules, any loan amount that is forgiven under REPAYE or any other income-driven repayment plan is considered taxable income.

How do I get the interest subsidy on my unsubsidized loan?

If you have subsidized loans and your monthly installment under REPAYE is not sufficient to pay the amount of interest that accrues on a monthly basis, the federal government will subsidize 100% of that accruing interest for the first three consecutive years. After the three-year period is over, the interest that’s not covered by your monthly payment will be subsidized at 50% instead of 100%.

Also, if you have unsubsidized loans, your unsubsidized interest will be subsidized at 50% for any period(s) of time that your REPAYE monthly payment due is not sufficient to pay the monthly interest.

I filed my recent tax return with my spouse but now we are separated. Do I still have to include my spouse’s income?

If you are separated from your spouse, you can indicate this in Section 4B of the request form and provide documentation of only your taxable income. Acceptable forms of income documentation can be found in Section 5 of the request form.

I filed my recent tax return with my spouse but I am not able to obtain income information from my spouse or have them sign the request form. What should I do?

If you are unable to access information about your spouse’s income and are not able to have them sign the Income-Driven Repayment request form, you can indicate this in Section 4B of the form and provide documentation of only your taxable income. Acceptable forms of income documentation can be found in Section 5 of the request form.

What can I use as proof of income for REPAYE?

You can provide the first page of your 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ or a tax return transcript. By completing the Income-Driven Repayment Request at https://studentaid.gov, your tax return can be sent electronically with your request.

If you or your spouse (if applicable) have had a significant change in your income since you filed your last federal income tax return, you may provide one piece of documentation from each source of taxable income for you (and your spouse) dated within the last 90 days. Acceptable proof of alternative documentation of income can be found in Section 5 of the request form.

If you or your spouse (if applicable) do not receive any taxable income, make sure to indicate this on the request form as this will serve as your proof of income.

I’m self-employed and my recent tax return doesn’t reflect what I’m currently making. How can I provide proof of my income? (or spouse’s income, if applicable)

You can provide a signed statement explaining that you are self-employed and include your projected gross monthly income from all sources. Please make sure to also include the name and address of your business in your statement.

Should I switch from my current income-driven repayment plan to REPAYE?

There are several benefits to repaying your loan(s) under REPAYE. In most cases, it offers a lower monthly payment, additional interest subsidies, and possibly an earlier forgiveness depending on whether your loans were for undergraduate or graduate study.

Use the Repayment Estimator on Federal Student Aid’s website. The estimator will display other monthly payment amounts for all repayment plans so you can select the plan that is right for you.

I’ve been repaying my loans under the Income-Based Repayment plan but want to switch to REPAYE. What do I need to do in order to switch to REPAYE?

In order to switch from Income-Based Repayment to any other repayment plan, you must first be placed on the Standard Repayment plan. Once you have made one payment on either the Standard Repayment plan or on a reduced-payment forbearance, you can then be placed on the REPAYE plan or another repayment plan.

Will the payments I’ve made under my other income-driven plan count as qualifying payments for REPAYE forgiveness?

Yes, payments made under other income-driven repayment plans will count as qualifying payments for REPAYE forgiveness. In addition, any payments made under a Standard 10-year plan, as well as any Permanent-Standard payments made under income-based repayment would count as qualifying payments.

Is REPAYE considered a qualifying repayment plan for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)?

Yes, payments made under the REPAYE plan are considered qualifying payments for PSLF. However, if you exit REPAYE and enter an alternative repayment plan, those are not considered qualifying payments for PSLF.

If I switch to REPAYE, will the payments I’ve made under my other income-driven repayment plan count as qualifying payments for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)?

Yes, payments made under other income-driven repayment plans do count as qualifying payments for PSLF.